26th September 2020: A surprisingly old technology with exciting potential in remote monitoring and disease screening

Read Health Trend’s full article here: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Let’s get to it…

🤷‍♂️ Problem

  • Chronic disease monitoring often requires invasive investigations carried out by healthcare professionals in locations away from the home.
  • The majority of global deaths each year (71% in 2016) are due to non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest contributor.

💡 Solution

  • Leverage wearable technology and large datasets to allow some aspects of chronic diseases to be monitored routinely, independently and through non-invasive methods.
  • Define new digital biomarkers that, when combined with readily available patient insights, can assist with disease screening and early diagnosis.

📖 Terms

  • Photoplethysmography (PPG) – an optical technique that measures changes in light absorption and can be used to detect blood volume changes. Shine a light through your wrist or finger – anywhere with a decent vascular bed, then quantify the light that is scattered back.

📚 History

  • German physician Karl Matthes (1905-1962) developed the first device to measure oxygen saturation back in 1935 using red and infrared filters.
  • This early use-case of what would become PPG was adopted by American Physiologist Glenn Millikan to make an ear oximeter which alerted pilots in World Ward II to low blood oxygen saturations.
  • It wasn’t until the 1980s however that pulse oximetry started to become routinely used in clinical practice.

Lifelight is listed in the article as one of the key commercial players.

Read the full article: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Source: Health Trends – Author – Dr Sandy Wright, Clinical Entrepreneur & AI Clinician, Babylon Health

26th September 2020: A surprisingly old technology with exciting potential in remote monitoring and disease screening

Read Health Trend’s full article here: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Let’s get to it…

🤷‍♂️ Problem

  • Chronic disease monitoring often requires invasive investigations carried out by healthcare professionals in locations away from the home.
  • The majority of global deaths each year (71% in 2016) are due to non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest contributor.

💡 Solution

  • Leverage wearable technology and large datasets to allow some aspects of chronic diseases to be monitored routinely, independently and through non-invasive methods.
  • Define new digital biomarkers that, when combined with readily available patient insights, can assist with disease screening and early diagnosis.

📖 Terms

  • Photoplethysmography (PPG) – an optical technique that measures changes in light absorption and can be used to detect blood volume changes. Shine a light through your wrist or finger – anywhere with a decent vascular bed, then quantify the light that is scattered back.

📚 History

  • German physician Karl Matthes (1905-1962) developed the first device to measure oxygen saturation back in 1935 using red and infrared filters.
  • This early use-case of what would become PPG was adopted by American Physiologist Glenn Millikan to make an ear oximeter which alerted pilots in World Ward II to low blood oxygen saturations.
  • It wasn’t until the 1980s however that pulse oximetry started to become routinely used in clinical practice.

Lifelight is listed in the article as one of the key commercial players.

Read the full article: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Source: Health Trends – Author – Dr Sandy Wright, Clinical Entrepreneur & AI Clinician, Babylon Health

26th September 2020: A surprisingly old technology with exciting potential in remote monitoring and disease screening

Read Health Trend’s full article here: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Let’s get to it…

🤷‍♂️ Problem

  • Chronic disease monitoring often requires invasive investigations carried out by healthcare professionals in locations away from the home.
  • The majority of global deaths each year (71% in 2016) are due to non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest contributor.

💡 Solution

  • Leverage wearable technology and large datasets to allow some aspects of chronic diseases to be monitored routinely, independently and through non-invasive methods.
  • Define new digital biomarkers that, when combined with readily available patient insights, can assist with disease screening and early diagnosis.

📖 Terms

  • Photoplethysmography (PPG) – an optical technique that measures changes in light absorption and can be used to detect blood volume changes. Shine a light through your wrist or finger – anywhere with a decent vascular bed, then quantify the light that is scattered back.

📚 History

  • German physician Karl Matthes (1905-1962) developed the first device to measure oxygen saturation back in 1935 using red and infrared filters.
  • This early use-case of what would become PPG was adopted by American Physiologist Glenn Millikan to make an ear oximeter which alerted pilots in World Ward II to low blood oxygen saturations.
  • It wasn’t until the 1980s however that pulse oximetry started to become routinely used in clinical practice.

Lifelight is listed in the article as one of the key commercial players.

Read the full article: When wearable tech doesn’t need to be worn

Source: Health Trends – Author – Dr Sandy Wright, Clinical Entrepreneur & AI Clinician, Babylon Health